LabTV Videos

DoD STEM initiatives are aimed at better preparing our children for the future. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. But STEM is more than just an acronym, it's a way to ensure America stays competitive.

LabTV videos feature compelling real-life stories by enthusiastic professionals to show students exactly why their STEM classroom studies matter. Each video is accompanied by a teacher guide designed to help educators develop a STEM lesson plan around each video.

The drop down boxes allows sorting by military service or by STEM subject area. All videos are also accessible on the LabTV YouTube Channel.

 

Breathe Easy 2015: Ship Filters Keep It Clean

Filters are used in buildings to collect dust, dirt, or chemicals from air to ensure that we don't take contaminants into our bodies. Sailors must be protected in their environment as well, so engineers at a Navy research lab in Dahlgren, Va., are designing and testing air filters to keep personnel safe on ships.

Military Branch: 
Navy
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Physical Science, Chemistry, Technology

Building Body Parts: Saving lives, salamander style

If an injured salamander can grow a new limb, why can't a human? Maybe they can, say researchers at the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine.

Starting with cells from patient's bodies, scientists at this Wake Forest University facility have grown 22 different types of tissues and organs. Lives are being saved and more amazing successes are on the way.

Military Branch: 
Army
Subject Area: 
Life Science, Cellular Biology, Technology

Carbon NanoPearls: Cooking Up Tomorrow's TV Technology

Combining the abilities of a master chef and a futuristic jeweler, materials engineer Shanee Pacley is a leading specialist in the exciting field of nanotechnology.

Pacley's specialty is nanopearls, clusters of extremely small balls of pure carbon that under a powerful microscope resemble a string of pearls. The young scientist cooks them up at 450 degrees Celsius and then studies their properties.

Military Branch: 
Air Force
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Formal Science, Mathematics, Physical Science, Chemistry, Technology

Cells In Space: Helping Astronauts and Injured Soldiers

An experiment created at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and blasted into space aboard the Space Shuttle is helping design better ways to treat injured soldiers and keep astronauts healthier.

Astronauts working in low gravity and the traumatically injured can both suffer from wasting, a condition where bone and muscle mass deteriorate. The automated Cell Culture Module aboard the Space Station helps study what is happening.

Military Branch: 
Army
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Earth and Space, Astronomy, Formal Science, Mathematics, Life Science, Cellular Biology, Physics, Technology

Ceramics: This Material Won't Melt Away

We all have items in our homes that are made of ceramics: dinner plates, floor tiles -- and toilets. And in the technical world, ceramics are used in electrical devices, fiber-optic cables, and even the space shuttle tiles.

A ceramic is strong and hard, but its best quality -- the most important to scientists -- is its high melting temperature, which allows engineers to use it in places where even metals would melt. At the laboratory at NAVSEA Carderock in Bethesda, Md., engineers are creating ceramics that will improve engine performance.

Military Branch: 
Navy
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Physical Science, Chemistry, Technology

Chill Out: Tiny Refrigerator Saves Hubble Camera

The Hubble Space Telescope peers deep into the universe and sends breathtaking images back to Earth. But when its infrared camera, NICMOS, lost its supply of cooling liquid nitrogen the pictures stopped.

NASA turned to physicist Erin Pettyjohn and her team at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico. They design and build very tiny refrigerators called cryocoolers. These little machines can cool things down to a very chilly 70 Kelvin. That's -203 C or -334 F!

Military Branch: 
Air Force
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Earth and Space, Astronomy, Formal Science, Mathematics, Physical Science, Physics, Technology

Clean Chemistry: Decontamination Is Key to Toxic Spills

There are different ways to deal with a toxic chemical. You can neutralize it chemically, you can physically remove it, or you can try to capture it in another material.

Military Branch: 
Navy
Subject Area: 
Physical Science, Chemistry

Color Writing: Analyzing Fuel to Keep Jets Flying High

Using a process called chromatography (or color writing), chemists are able to break out all the components in a mixture. Dye makers use this technique to separate the different pigments in their dyes, but the process also is valuable in crime and environmental research.

Military Branch: 
Air Force
Subject Area: 
Formal Science, Mathematics, Life Science, Functional Biology, Physical Science, Chemistry, Technology