LabTV Videos

DoD STEM initiatives are aimed at better preparing our children for the future. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. But STEM is more than just an acronym, it's a way to ensure America stays competitive.

LabTV videos feature compelling real-life stories by enthusiastic professionals to show students exactly why their STEM classroom studies matter. Each video is accompanied by a teacher guide designed to help educators develop a STEM lesson plan around each video.

The drop down boxes allows sorting by military service or by STEM subject area. All videos are also accessible on the LabTV YouTube Channel.

 

Computer Vision: Teaching Machines to Recognize Images

Shown two photos of a person taken from different angles, most people will immediately recognize them as the same person. But it's not that easy for a computer because their brains are not as flexible as human brains.

Teaching computers to see more like humans is the job of Alan VanNevel and his team of scientists at a Navy Research Lab in Chino Lake. They've created some amazing pattern recognition programs - using math.

Military Branch: 
Navy
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Formal Science, Mathematics, Life Science, Functional Biology, Technology

Dolphin Lifesavers pt. 1: Training for a Mission

It sounds risky - but it's not. Mines are designed to go off when ships bump into them, not dolphins, so these brave underwater explorers are the perfect helpers to protect our Navy crews from dangerous underwater explosives.

At the Navy's Marine Mammal Program in San Diego, California, these amazing animals are trained to find mines and then flag their location.

Military Branch: 
Navy
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Life Science, Functional Biology, Technology

Dolphin Lifesavers pt. 2: How Dolphins see with Sound

In today's world of unmanned underwater vehicles, the bottlenose dolphin is still the Navy's best defense against dangerous underwater mines. The dolphins have a unique ability to find objects using their biological sonar, called echolocation. They produce clicks - and then listen for the echos as the sound bounces off objects. They can then figure out if the object is a fish or a ship or a mine. Scientists at the Navy's Marine Mammal Program in San Diego, California have developed a "biosonar monitoring tool" so they can study just how echolocation works.

Military Branch: 
Navy
Subject Area: 
Life Science, Functional Biology, Technology

Don't Sweat It: Scientists Are Protecting Soldiers at Any Temperature

Our troops go into all types of environments -- some very cold or hot -- to perform their missions. Scientists at an Army research lab in Natick, Mass., are studying the effects of extreme temperatures on volunteer subjects so they can figure out the best way to help soldiers endure challenging climates.

Military Branch: 
Army
Subject Area: 
Formal Science, Mathematics, Life Science, Functional Biology, Technology

Eat Up!: Food Scientists Figure Out How to Feed the Troops

Soldiers in combat require massive amounts of energy to be able to endure the tough conditions. To fuel their bodies, they must consume about 3,600 calories (or units of energy) every day -- nearly twice the amount that teenagers back home need to stay healthy!

Each soldier carries his own food -- a portable meal (called an MRE, or Meal, Ready to Eat) that's lightweight, nonperishable, and tasty. These meals contain entrees and side dishes, snacks, and drinks as well as a flameless ration heater -- a plastic pouch that heats food when a soldier adds water.

Military Branch: 
Army
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Formal Science, Mathematics, Life Science, Functional Biology, Physical Science, Physics, Technology

Eye In The Sky: 40 Pounds of Amazing Aircraft

Launched using a portable catapult and captured by a hook when its mission is over, the Scan Eagle is 40 pounds of amazing aircraft. The plane and its payloads are tested at a Navy Research Lab in China Lake.

Flying all day on just a little gas and remotely controlled by mouse clicks, the unmanned arial vehicle returns live video that helps keep Navy and Marine units safe in the field.

“It keeps the human away from the danger,” says T.J. Zacman, an aircraft engineer. “You can fly down to 1,000 feet and not worry about getting shot down.”

Military Branch: 
Navy
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Earth and Space, Astronomy, Physical Science, Physics, Technology

Fighting Malaria: The Army's New Weapon Against a Killer

Physician Scientist Peter Weina and his team at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research have declared war on the world's most deadly disease, malaria.

Malaria kills over six million people each year, most of them in South America, Africa, India, and Southeast Asia. It is a nasty disease caused by a tiny protozoa and transmitted by mosquitoes. The current treatment is a 300-year-old drug named quinine and it doesn't work very well.

Military Branch: 
Army
Subject Area: 
Life Science, Cellular Biology, Functional Biology, Technology

First-Person Thinker

American soldiers are masters at using their weapons to survive in combat zones. Now, with a video-game system called ELECT BiLAT, scientists and engineers are showing troops how to add another dimension -- enhanced cultural awareness and social skills -- to their arsenal of talents.

Military Branch: 
Army
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Social Science, Sociology, Technology